Tag Archives: DUI

OVI / DUI in Ohio Facts

Ohio drunk driving cases are referred to as Ohio OVI (operating a vehicle while intoxicated), Ohio DUI (driving under the influence of alcohol), or Ohio OMVI (operating a motor vehicle while under the influence, impaired, or intoxicated). All of these acronyms relate to the same offense, found in the Ohio Revised Code.

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Can the Child choose which Parent they want to live with in Ohio?

It is one of the most common myths that people maintain when it comes to child custody: Once a child reaches a certain age, that child can choose which parent to live with, right? Well, that is actually incorrect. However, this myth is based in history and actually grounded is truth. Under former Ohio law, once a child attained the age of 12 years old,child_support_ohio_termination that child had the power to choose which parent was to be deemed the residential parent and legal custodian of that child. However, under current Ohio law, minor children no longer have the ability to choose which parent they want to live with on a permanent basis. In other words, when the Court issues its final divorce decree which, among other things, allocates parental rights and responsibilities, it is not the child that determines which parent is to be the residential parent, even if that child is a teenager. Ohio law treats a 14 year old in the same manner as a 4 year old when it comes to determining which parent with be designated as the residential parent. And, like almost all issues involving minor children, the determination is guided by what is in the “best interest of the child”.

So, divorcing parents, remember that your child will not be choosing for or against you when it comes to custody issues. Rather, the Court will decide and you need to focus your energy on convincing the Court that it would be in the best interest of the child to live with you … do not work on convincing the child that he or she should choose you. Which, in truth, is not fair to the child anyway.

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Can the Child choose which Parent they want to live with in Ohio?

It is one of the most common myths that people maintain when it comes to child custody: Once a child reaches a certain age, that child can choose which parent to live with, right? Well, that is actually incorrect. However, this myth is based in history and actually grounded is truth. Under former Ohio law, once a child attained the age of 12 years old,child_support_ohio_termination that child had the power to choose which parent was to be deemed the residential parent and legal custodian of that child. However, under current Ohio law, minor children no longer have the ability to choose which parent they want to live with on a permanent basis. In other words, when the Court issues its final divorce decree which, among other things, allocates parental rights and responsibilities, it is not the child that determines which parent is to be the residential parent, even if that child is a teenager. Ohio law treats a 14 year old in the same manner as a 4 year old when it comes to determining which parent with be designated as the residential parent. And, like almost all issues involving minor children, the determination is guided by what is in the “best interest of the child”.

So, divorcing parents, remember that your child will not be choosing for or against you when it comes to custody issues. Rather, the Court will decide and you need to focus your energy on convincing the Court that it would be in the best interest of the child to live with you … do not work on convincing the child that he or she should choose you. Which, in truth, is not fair to the child anyway.

Posted in Family Law | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 55 Comments

Can the Child choose which Parent they want to live with in Ohio?

It is one of the most common myths that people maintain when it comes to child custody: Once a child reaches a certain age, that child can choose which parent to live with, right? Well, that is actually incorrect. However, this myth is based in history and actually grounded is truth. Under former Ohio law, once a child attained the age of 12 years old,child_support_ohio_termination that child had the power to choose which parent was to be deemed the residential parent and legal custodian of that child. However, under current Ohio law, minor children no longer have the ability to choose which parent they want to live with on a permanent basis. In other words, when the Court issues its final divorce decree which, among other things, allocates parental rights and responsibilities, it is not the child that determines which parent is to be the residential parent, even if that child is a teenager. Ohio law treats a 14 year old in the same manner as a 4 year old when it comes to determining which parent with be designated as the residential parent. And, like almost all issues involving minor children, the determination is guided by what is in the “best interest of the child”.

So, divorcing parents, remember that your child will not be choosing for or against you when it comes to custody issues. Rather, the Court will decide and you need to focus your energy on convincing the Court that it would be in the best interest of the child to live with you … do not work on convincing the child that he or she should choose you. Which, in truth, is not fair to the child anyway.

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DUI / OVI Ohio Penalties

ovi_ohioBelow is a list of penalties for an OVI or Operating a Vehicle While Intoxicated,  also known as a DUI or DWI.  If you have recently been charged with an OVI/DWI/DUI and desire the assistance of an attorney please call the law offices of Morrison & Nicholson at (937) 432-9775 or visit our free online consultation page.

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Administrative License Suspension (ALS)
• If you are stopped for drunk driving and you refuse to take the sobriety test, or if your test results exceed the legal limit of Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC),
the officer can take your driver’s license on the spot, and the suspension begins immediately.
• Depending on previous offenses or refusals, you can have your license automatically suspended for a period of 90 days to five years.
• The administrative suspension is independent of any jail term, fine or other criminal penalty imposed in court for a DUI offense.

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1st Offense
• Administrative License Suspension (ALS) for a prohibited BAC;
• ALS for test refusal = one year license suspension;
• Jail – Minimum of three consecutive days or 3-day driver intervention program;
• Fine – Minimum $200 and not more than $1,000;
• Court License Suspension – 6 months to 3 years.
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2nd Offense
• ALS for one year for a prohibited BAC;
• ALS for test refusal = two year license suspension;
• Jail – Minimum of 10 consecutive days or five days jail + minimum 18 consecutive days of electronically monitored house arrest combined, not to exceed 6 months;
• Fine – Minimum $300 and not more than $1,500;
• Discretionary driver’s intervention program;
• Vehicle immobilization and plates impounded for 90 days;
• Court License Suspension – 1 year to 5 years.
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3rd Offense
• ALS for two years for a prohibited BAC;
• ALS for test refusal = three year license suspension;
• Jail – Minimum 30 consecutive days to one year;
• Alternative sentence – 15 days or Jail + minimum 55 consecutive days of electronically monitored house arrest combined, maximum of one year;
• Fine – Minimum $500 and not more than $2,500;
• Mandatory attendance in an alcohol treatment program paid for by offender;
• Vehicle immobilization and plates impounded for 180 days;
• Court License Suspension – 1 year to 10 years.
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4th or More Offense or Motor Vehicle Related Felony
• ALS for three years for a prohibited BAC;
• ALS for test refusal = five years license suspension;
• Jail – Minimum of 60 consecutive days and up to one year in jail;
• Fine – Minimum $750 and not more than $10,000;
• Mandatory drug/alcohol treatment program paid for by offender;
• Vehicle Forfeiture – Mandatory criminal forfeiture of vehicle operated by offender, imposed by court;
• Court License Suspension – 3 years to Permanent Revocation.

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